For as long as I can remember, I have harbored a fascination with labyrinths. So, when I met Laura Young, a docent of the labyrinth program at  Brookgreen Gardens, I was absolutely thrilled!

Our paths crossed recently when we met to conduct business for another organization we both volunteer for. It was when we were talking and getting to know one another that I discovered the volunteer work she does at Brookgreen Gardens.

What followed was a fascinating hour and a half of discussion that left me wishing that I made it a habit of carrying my mics with me at all times. Fortunately for me, she was gracious enough to agree to meet me a few days later in an attempt to re-create our visit, which can now be heard on The Pause podcast.

The Labyrinth at Brookgreen Gardens

(Taken from the brochure Laura shared with me.)

The labyrinth at Brookgreen Gardens was inspired by supporter/volunteers Richard and Amy Webb. Funding was provided by the generous contribution of Brookgreen volunteers.

It was built in 2008 and underwent a substantial redesign in 2014 under the discretion of artist Kenny Pellar.

It is maintained today by both staff and volunteers as an oasis for members and guests.

The labyrinth is available to walkers any time the Gardens are open (364 days/year; regular schedule is 9:30 am – 5:00 pm).

Because of it’s location on the creek, it is closed when weather conditions indicate safety concerns. For those curious to know its status on any given day, they can contact the Welcome Center at 843-235-6000.

How to Walk a Labyrinth

In the English language the words labyrinth and maze are incorrectly used interchangeably. The labyrinth differs from a maze in that that it has only one path and there are no dead ends. The path winds throughout and becomes a mirror for where we are in our lives, touching our sorrows and releasing our joys.

Walk it with an open mind and an open heart.

Quiet your mind and become aware of your breath. Allow yourself to find the pace your body wants to go. The path is a two-way street. Those going in will meet those coming out. You may “pass” people or let others step around you. Do what feels natural when you meet. Allow one minute between people as you enter the labyrinth.

States of a Labyrinth Walk

Purgation (Releasing)

The act of shedding thoughts and distractions enables you to let go of the details of your life. This is the time to open your heart and quiet your mind.

Illumination (Receiving)

At the center, stay there as long as you like, sit or stand, meditate or pray. Allow yourself to receive guidance.

Union (Returning)

To leave the center, follow the same path back out. There can be a strange sense of strengthening as clarity. You become more empowered to find and do the work you feel your soul calling for.

To stay up-to-date on the happenings of the Labyrinth at Brookgreen Gardens, “like” the Brookgreen Gardens or The Pause with Dawna pages on Facebook.

Listen to Dawna’s visit with Laura below!

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This post was originally posted on Seraphsquill.com.

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